Download Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy by Carmel Lum PDF

By Carmel Lum

Speech and language pathologists, like several execs who declare to be clinical of their perform, make a public dedication to function at the foundation of data derived based on sound medical criteria. but scholars in verbal exchange problems are given fairly little grounding within the basics of technology; certainly, they generally obtain implicit encouragement to depend upon medical knowledge. This pathbreaking textual content introduces the rules of severe medical pondering as they relate to assessing conversation difficulties, finding out approximately replacement techniques to intervention, and comparing results. the writer offers many illustrative examples to assist readers contextualize the guidelines. Her transparent presentation can help not just undergraduate and graduate scholars but in addition validated pros cause extra successfully approximately what they're doing and why. although the examples come from speech and language pathology, this illuminating and readable booklet constitutes a important source for all scientific practitioners.

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Scientific Thinking in Speech and Language Therapy

Speech and language pathologists, like several pros who declare to be clinical of their perform, make a public dedication to function at the foundation of information derived in keeping with sound medical criteria. but scholars in communique problems are given rather little grounding within the basics of technology; certainly, they generally obtain implicit encouragement to depend on scientific knowledge.

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4. Use definite, specific, concrete language—Write without using ambiguous terms. / incor­ rectly on 8/10 trials. (Definite, specific, concrete language) John produced several different kinds of errors in the test. (Vague, unclear language) 5. Avoid loaded language—Avoid using language that sways the emotions of the audience either for or against the view you present. Example The clinician who impatiently pulled the book out of his tiny hands intimidated the poor boy. (Loaded language) The boy looked at the clinician when she removed the book from him.

They all help people get better. I believe the expert must be right. Chapter 2 I believe research and science are the same thing. Chapter 4 I believe that event A has caused B to happen because B always happens after A has occurred. Chapter 5 I believe my theory about a disorder is correct because all the cases I have seen show the same signs. Chapter 5 Chapter 3 Outcome The information in textbooks may not always be subject to review for its factual accuracy. In a democratic society, there is great tolerance for a variety of opinions and views, not all of which can be taken as valid forms of knowledge.

LeBlanc (1998), Richards (1987), and Weston (1992) provide further information and examples. THE PRINCIPLE OF FALSIFIABILITY Popper (1972) proposed a principle known as the principle of falsifiability. The common example given to illustrate his point relates to a story about swans. Once, everyone believed all swans are white because that was all anyone ever 32 CHAPTER 3 saw—until black swans were observed in Australia. Thereafter, people's under­ standing of swans was irrevocably altered based on this new observation.

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